Use of Name Frequently Asked Questions on Use of Name

  1. Why do we need to protect the Johns Hopkins name? Johns Hopkins Medicine is internationally known for excellence in research, teaching and patient care. The widely recognized Johns Hopkins name and its associated logo, icon and brandmark (together referred to as name and marks) represent the high caliber of the Johns Hopkins faculty, staff and students and convey the quality and breadth of Johns Hopkins' endeavors. The Johns Hopkins name and marks are among Johns Hopkins Medicine's most valuable assets. Faculty, students and staff share in the benefits associated with the Johns Hopkins name and marks and therefore also share responsibilities concerning their use. Johns Hopkins Medicine will actively protect its name and marks from improper or misleading use by individuals or organizations not associated with the institution and will assure that use of the name and marks by faculty, students, alumni, staff, Johns Hopkins programs and others is appropriate.
  2. Who has to follow the Johns Hopkins Medicine Brand and Use of Name guidelines? Everyone. Johns Hopkins Medicine stands for excellence and integrity in research, teaching and patient care. Every use of our name and brandmarks conveys an association with Johns Hopkins Medicine and potentially affects the institution's reputation. Some uses are appropriate and desirable; others are potentially damaging and must be avoided.
  3. How should Johns Hopkins Medicine and its organizations' names be referred to? Click here
  4. Can a company quote me in its material if there is no use of the Johns Hopkins name? Faculty, staff, students, and trainees may not be quoted in third party organization materials in the areas of their professional expertise. Exceptions may be made only in rare instances with the written permission of an authorized JHM official. To seek permission or if you have questions,  contact Jim Lustek, Director of Brand Management or use the Brand and Name Use Request.
  5. Can the Johns Hopkins name be used as an endorsement? Use of the Johns Hopkins name, logo and brandmark by third parties is strictly prohibited unless written permission from Johns Hopkins has been granted by authorized Johns Hopkins representatives. This policy applies to all uses of Johns Hopkins Medicine names, entities and brandmark. When ambiguity or confusion about endorsement still exists in an otherwise approved use, Johns Hopkins requires explicit and prominent disclaimers saying that it does not endorse or approve the services or products of organizations and companies.
  6. When can I use the Johns Hopkins name in a book that is written by Johns Hopkins faculty? Use of the Johns Hopkins Medicine name or logo in the title of a book, CD, DVD, video, Web site or other publication in any medium needs to be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Click here
  7. What entities, programs and centers make up Johns Hopkins Medicine and The Johns Hopkins University?
    In an organization as complex as Johns Hopkins Medicine, it's not surprising when people are confused about when to use what name. It's legally important to use the various Johns Hopkins names correctly, whether it's in a contract, a Web site, printed materials (including books and papers) or public speaking. Click here
  8. Can I use the Johns Hopkins name in letters, contracts, funding proposals and fund-raising documents? Use of name generally is allowed if it is strictly factual.
  9. Can I place another company's or institution's logo, slogan or Web site on my business card, letterhead or collateral, and/or Web sites? No, you may only use the Johns Hopkins or related entities' names on your business cards, letterhead, and marketing material. You may not use another institution, organization logo, slogan, Web site or name of any product or product-related material.
  10. How should my name and Johns Hopkins faculty title appear in publications? When you write or contribute to professional and consumer health publications, you may use your Johns Hopkins faculty title provided that use of the institution's name does not create an appearance of institutional involvement and the institution's name does not appear in larger font than the name of the author(s). Click here
  11. Can I use my Johns Hopkins title in political statements, endorsements, campaigns and ads? Faculty and staff MUST contact Government Affairs before participating in public policy discussions on behalf of Johns Hopkins. In addition, Johns Hopkins employees seeking advice regarding related public policy activities can contact Government Affairs. Click here
  12. Can I use the Johns Hopkins Medicine name in promotional activities, exhibits, trade shows? The Johns Hopkins Medicine name should not be used with activities involving third parties if the activities might be viewed as endorsement of a commercial product or imply approval of a private company. Click here
  13. A company that makes a product we use in our clinic has offered patient information brochures to us for free, provided we display them and make them available publicly to our patients. The brochures have good information in them but also promote or feature the company's product. Can we use these brochures?
    Under the Johns Hopkins Medicine policy on Interaction with Industry Policy, Johns Hopkins Medicine faculty and clinics should develop their own patient information materials without corporate sponsorship or branding. If that is not possible or practical, clinics may in selected cases offer company-developed material, including when the company name is cited, if a Johns Hopkins Medicine physician determines the material is accurate and useful to patients and is more informational than promotional.  The material may list a corporate name (e.g., Schering-Plough), but It also is possible to repurpose these materials by pasting plain white labels over the product and corporate names and promotions.
  14. I want to recruit volunteer subjects to participate in a clinical trial. May I use the Johns Hopkins Medicine logos on the ads? Clinical trial recruitment advertisements must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board.
  15. U.S. News &World Report magazine has on its Web site commentaries and advice from Johns Hopkins physicians on pages where there is product advertising. Isn't this prohibited by the guidelines?
    No. Johns Hopkins has agreed to provide some consumer health content to the magazine with the understanding that adjacent advertising will be entirely unrelated to any of the subject matter from Hopkins experts and will also exclude drug or medical device advertising. In addition, the magazine may not present the content in a way that suggests an endorsement of the magazine or products advertised in it by Johns Hopkins. The experts quoted by the magazine come from a variety of medical centers and not just Johns Hopkins, and Hopkins content is entirely vetted by Johns Hopkins faculty.
  16. I run a Hopkins clinic in facial and plastic surgery. When I advertise the clinic's services, am I permitted to use brand names of products we use, such as Botox or Restylane? Non-Hopkins practices use the names; if I don't, we will be at a competitive disadvantage.
    Johns Hopkins Medicine guidelines prohibit the use of product names and services in our advertisements and prohibit vendors and clinics from displaying advertisements in the clinics themselves.  This is true whether or not a vendor offers a discount. In some selected cases, Johns Hopkins Medicine will permit a listing of products as a group in an ad or brochure. All such requests to use vendor logos, names and displays must be reviewed.
  17. I am on the part-time clinical faculty. Am I bound by the Johns Hopkins Medicine policies on use of name?
    Part-time faculty members whose credentials are in good standing may cite their title (including the fact that they are part time) on their Web sites, stationery and other materials. They may not use Johns Hopkins Medicine logos or imply endorsement of their communications or services by Johns Hopkins Medicine without prior review of proposed uses. In addition, Johns Hopkins Medicine strongly discourages part-time faculty members from endorsing products or services.
  18. I noticed that Web sites and a national magazine have used content quoting Johns Hopkins experts in special sections paid for by advertisers.  Do our policies permit that?
    Johns Hopkins provides tailored content to Yahoo Health and (in the past) Time magazine. In the former case, Johns Hopkins is paid for the content. In the latter, no money changed hands. In both cases, we required that advertising be unrelated to the Hopkins content and that there be prominent disclaimers noting that Hopkins does not endorse or support any product or service that is advertised on the Website or in the publication.
  19. Can outside groups or individuals fundraise for Johns Hopkins Medicine entities and use Johns Hopkins logos and/or institutional or faculty/staff endorsements?
    Requests to use Johns Hopkins logos or institutional, faculty or staff quotes or contract endorsements for fundraising purposes require review from the Fund for Johns Hopkins Medicine and the use of name review committee. In general, well-recognized and authorized groups that hold fundraising events can note that proceeds will go to Johns Hopkins, but they may not use logos, quotes or testimonials from Johns Hopkins faculty or staff.
  20. Disclaimers when linking to outside Web sites
    As a service to patients, our division's Web site includes links to various patient advocacy organizations.  We have no control over those organizations' sites and cannot monitor them regularly.  What if those sites contain errors or are not up to date?
    Any Johns Hopkins Medicine Web site, whether maintained by a department, division, program, center or other organizational unit, must post the following disclaimer when linking to outside Web sites:  "You are being redirected to a Web site outside of Johns Hopkins for information purposes only. Johns Hopkins is not responsible for any aspect of the external Web site."
  21. Outside vendors wanting to publish ads on JHM Web sites
    The physicians in the clinical center I administer frequently prescribe medications made by three companies. One of the companies would like to post an ad on the Web site maintained by our center.  Is this allowed?

    In keeping with Johns Hopkins Medicine policy that neither faculty, staff nor the institution can participate in activity that constitutes or implies endorsement of a commercial product, your Hopkins site may not accept or post company ads.

  22. Educational videos produced by medical supply vendors promoting procedures and products posted on Hopkins Web sites
    We recently purchased a device for a novel procedure our clinic has started offering. The vendor has created an educational video for a patient that explains the procedure. We believe the video contains accurate information and is well produced. The product name is featured and the manufacturer's name is mentioned at the end of the clip. The procedure is not done at the first office visit.  At that visit, the physician explains the procedure as well as its risks and benefits-to the patient.  Then the patient must decide whether to have the procedure and make another appointment.  We would like to make the video available to patients considering this intervention because we think it will aid their understanding of the procedure.  May we post the video on our Web site? 
    Posting the company's video on a Hopkins Web site, although partly informational, also promotes the device and its manufacturer. A company-produced video detailing the procedure should not be posted because in part it is promotional, but also because it could be misleading; the procedure may not be appropriate for all patients. If you believe the video is valuable for patients for whom the procedure is recommended by a physician in the clinic and there is no other source for this information, you may provide it to those patients considering or preparing for the procedure. You should ask the company if you can distribute it on a disk or memory stick so you can give it to those patients.

  23. I noticed that Web sites and a national magazine have used content quoting Johns Hopkins experts in special sections paid for by advertisers.  Do our policies permit that?
    Johns Hopkins provides tailored content to Yahoo Health and (in the past) Time magazine. In the former case, Johns Hopkins is paid for the content. In the latter, no money changed hands. In both cases, we required that advertising be unrelated to the Hopkins content and that there be prominent disclaimers noting that Hopkins does not endorse or support any product or service that is advertised on the Website or in the publication.
  24. U.S.News & World Report magazine has on its Web site commentaries and advice from Johns Hopkins physicians on pages where there is product advertising. Isn't this prohibited by the guidelines?
    No. Johns Hopkins has agreed to provide some consumer health content to the magazine with the understanding that adjacent advertising will be entirely unrelated to any of the subject matter from Hopkins experts and will also exclude drug or medical device advertising. In addition, the magazine may not present the content in a way that suggests an endorsement of the magazine or products advertised in it by Johns Hopkins. The experts quoted by the magazine come from a variety of medical centers and not just Johns Hopkins, and Hopkins content is entirely vetted by Johns Hopkins faculty.
  25. I am a faculty member and I participate in online social media on my own time. Occasionally, I post blogs on health care sites. May I state that I am on the Johns Hopkins faculty?  Johns Hopkins faculty or staff may post blogs or participate in social media outside Johns Hopkins.  In doing so, however, any use of their Johns Hopkins title and affiliation must be accompanied by a disclaimer, as follows:   "Dr./Mr./Ms. [Name]'s post on this site is made in a personal capacity and is independent of his/her affiliation with Johns Hopkins [University/Health System]."
  26. See Social Media Standards and Guidelines